Film Reflection: Africa

One of BBC Earth's TV miniseries, Africa features the staples of intensive camera work and David Attenborough. The six-episode series released in 2013 travels between the Kalahari Desert, eastern savanna, Congo rainforest, southern Cape, Sahara, and a thematic episode focused on conservation and Africa's future. African wildlife and wilderness are full of jungle and safari …

Continue reading Film Reflection: Africa

Advertisements

Book Reflection: “The Practical Naturalist” by Chris Packham

Your favorite civilian natural science book comes with prerequisites: vivid photos from altocumulous clouds to decomposition fungi, key hiding spots of small insects and charismatic critters, and nontechnical but curiosity-provoking descriptions of ecological concepts--all of which fill The Practical Naturalist. Edited by Chris Packham and written by a team of scientists, this book is detailed …

Continue reading Book Reflection: “The Practical Naturalist” by Chris Packham

Views of Lake Fort Smith Part II: Scientist

There's a phenomenon science students experience. Perhaps there's an inspirational, rare term assigned to it though I do not know what that would be. The landscape is no longer a cohesive environment of greenery and blotchy earth colors punctured by charismatic creatures and dramatic waterfalls. It...becomes millions of things that non-sciency friends rare their eyebrows …

Continue reading Views of Lake Fort Smith Part II: Scientist

Book Reflection: “American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree”

The American chestnut tree, Castanea dentata, was one of the first biological icons to be virtually vacated from an integral position in both the environment and American society. We knew little about accidental imports of exotic species, and the introduction of the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica spurred the discussion and action. I was fascinated with the topic when …

Continue reading Book Reflection: “American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree”

Wilson Park: Dogs, Flowers and Fungi (oh! the fungi)

Deep oak and hickory wood laced with purring creeks and rocky rubble beckon me, but most days they must wait, as getting out of town to the nearest decent public hiking area requires twenty minutes--more than one can afford on a working day. Instead I often opt for a five minute drive (to avoid crossing …

Continue reading Wilson Park: Dogs, Flowers and Fungi (oh! the fungi)

Keystone Species in a Yellowstone Shell

Keystone species: like a stone bridging the two sides of an arch, once removed the structure crumbles. One of ecologists favorite example in the last twenty years has been the grey wolf. Humans have a long history of destroying ecosystems and obliterating biodiversity. More than likely we've seen the loss of more keystone species than …

Continue reading Keystone Species in a Yellowstone Shell

6thExtinctioncover

Review: The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert

Patrons of my local library vie for this book. I waited several weeks before I got a chance, even though The Sixth Extinction was published over a year before this time. Then I couldn't renew it, because of course someone else was in line to read it. Several weeks later down the waiting list I …

Continue reading Review: The Sixth Extinction by Elizabeth Kolbert