Stigma Stigma: Misadventure in Identifying Plants

Hundreds and perhaps thousands of unidentified plant photos lurk in my hard drive. I've always intended to manage and catalogue them, maybe make blogging an excuse to learn the botany world one species at a time. I daresay I've failed and should try harder. One of my earliest photos back in March 2012 includes this …

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Views of Lake Fort Smith Part I: Civilian

Lake Fort Smith is one of the more popular hiking and boating destinations in my area. There the Ozark Highlands Trail, a 218 mile chain of interconnected trails and collectively the second longest in the state (the Ouachita Trail being the longest at 223 miles). They must be growing, because before I checked I could …

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Book Reflection: “American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree”

The American chestnut tree, Castanea dentata, was one of the first biological icons to be virtually vacated from an integral position in both the environment and American society. We knew little about accidental imports of exotic species, and the introduction of the fungus Cryphonectria parasitica spurred the discussion and action. I was fascinated with the topic when …

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Trending: Mycorrhizae Without Writing “Mycorrhizae”

Mycorrhizal fungi grow in and around plant root as well as provide a nutrient-exchanging path for different individual plants. Occasionally I'll see some meme or link to a brief YouTube video about these fungi, not that one would recognize the term "mycorhizzal" because it is never used. It's danced around. Sometimes substituted with something in …

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Litter is Gold by Leah Markum

Project365: October Autumn

As unfortunate as it is, I'm doing a Project365 in a year that happened to have rained a lot early in the year but not later, and I suspect that has led to the drabby autumn scenery. Last year autumn was a blast of rich color. Last year would have been a great year for …

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Yucca Pollination: a Story of a Synchronized Relationship

Honey bees get most of the press as far as pollinators are concerned. Sometimes butterflies and bats receive honorary mention. Usually only in certain circles do non-honey bees, essentially all bees save for the European brand that we raise in apiculture, take the stage. Yucca moths not so much. From a botanical and evolutionary standpoint, …

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White-Tailed Deer Fawn

Project365: May Wild Life

May was a good month to flip open some identification books, open tabs on identification websites, and start labeling organisms. Some were easy to the species, some I was lucky to have evidence to assign by genus or even subfamily. Some I've seen throughout much of my life and everyone seems to know the common …

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